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Welcome to The Complementary Health Institute

An Online Learning Platform for Heath, Nutrition, Well-Being, Holistic Living, Herbal Medicine and Self Development Courses.

 

Welcome to CHI, an innovative online training platform for short courses about all aspects of Health, Herbs and Holistic Living.

If you want fresh knowledge about empowered living you’re in the right place. With the help of our courses you can acquire the wisdom to honour yourself and to encourage a self-governing state of joy, vitality, great health and wellbeing.

But it doesn’t stop there.

 

CHI’s growing resources of online courses makes learning fun and super easy. Better still, you can boost your wisdom at affordable prices.

We believe that knowledge is best served fresh and available to everyone, so that everyone has a chance to benefit from these powerful resources. And to get you started on your health journey (err… to sweeten the deal) we offer a range of free courses too.

 

Learning should be simple (+ fun). That’s why you can access each course from the comfort of your home. We know you’re busy, that’s why you can move through the lectures at your own pace. So take your time.

What students love the most about the CHI online study platform is that there are no tests or exams. At the completion of each course you will receive a certificate of completion from the CHI Institute.

 

Online learning comes with bulk benefits, such as:

 

  • EASE… learn in your own time and pace.
  • COMFORT… study at home.
  • CONTROL… you’re the boss, pick your study hours.
  • AFFORDABILITY… No need for timely and costly work commutes.
  • MORE FREEDOM… because you don’t require travel.
  • ADDITIONAL SKILLS… say hello to self empowerment and new possibilities.

How to enrol in a CHI course?

1. Press any of the course images to read more about that course.

2. Select a course to take, complete payment and we’ll give you immediate access to that course.

3. Proceed through the course in your own time (we give you all the time you need).

When you study with the CHI Online Institute you are taking a giant step forward into governing your own life. Take responsibility for your body, health, mind and spirit, for you and your family… and feel empowered about the life choices you make.

 

We aim to make these online courses educational, easy and enjoyable.

 


parsleyHerb Name
- Parsley   
Botanical Name - Petroselinum crispum
Family -  Umbelliferare/Apacieae
Other Names  - Apium petroselinum, Petroselinum lativum, Petersylinge, Persely, Persele
Parts Used - The tap root, leaves and seeds.
 
History

Native to the Eastern Mediterranean, cultivated worldwide. The Garden Parsley is not indigenous to Britain: Linnaeus stated its wild habitat to be Sardinia, whence it was brought to England and apparently first cultivated here in 1548. Bentham considered it a native of the Eastern Mediterranean regions. Since its introduction into these islands in the sixteenth century it has been completely naturalized in various parts of the world, on old walls and rocks. There is an old superstition against transplanting parsley plants. The herb is said to have been dedicated to Persephone and to funeral rites by the Greeks. It was afterwards consecrated to St. Peter in his character of successor to Charon.

Petroselinum, the specific name of the Parsley is said to have been assigned to it by Dioscorides. The Ancients distinguished between two plants Selinon, one being the Celery (Apium graveolens) and called heleioselinon - i.e. 'Marsh selinon,' and the other, parsley - Oreoselinon, 'Mountain selinon'; or petroselinum, signifying 'Rock selinon.' This last name in the Middle Ages became corrupted into Petrocilium - this was anglicized into Petersylinge, Persele, Persely and finally Parsley.

Description

Several cultivated varieties exist, the principal being the common plain-leaved, the curled-leaved, the Hamburg or broadleaved and the celery-leaved. Of the variety crispum, or curled-leaved, there are no less than thirty-seven variations; the most valuable are those of a compact habit with close, perfectly curled leaves. The common sort bears close leaves, but is of a somewhat hardier nature than those of which the leaves are curled; the latter are, however, superior in every way. The variety crispum was grown in very early days, being even mentioned by Pliny.

The Hamburg, or turnip-rooted Parsley, is grown only for the sake of its enlarged fleshy tap-root. Neapolitan, or celery-leaved, parsley is grown for the use of its leafstalks, which are blanched and eaten like those of celery.

The plain-leaved parsley is less attractive than those of the curled, less brilliant green, and coarser in flavour. It also has too close a resemblance to Fool's Parsley (Anthriscus cynapium), a noxious weed of a poisonous nature infesting gardens and fields. The leaves of the latter, though similar, are, however, of a rather darker green and when bruised, emit an unpleasant odour, very different to that of Parsley. They are, also, more finely divided. When the two plants are in flower, they are easily distinguished, Anthriscus having three tiny, narrow, sharp-pointed leaflets hanging down under each little umbellule of the white umbel of flowers, whereas in the Garden Parsley there is usually only one leaflet under the main umbel, the leaflets or bracts at the base of the small umbellules only being short and as fine as hairs. Anthriscus leaves, also, are glossy bene

Active Constituents

Volatile oil, containing apiole, myristicin,[[beta]]-phellandrene, p-mentha-l,3,8-triene, 4- isopropenyl-l-methylbenzene,2-(p-toluyl)propan-2-ol. Coumarins Flavonoids Phthalides Vitamins.

Actions

Diuretic
Expectorant
Emmenagogue
Carminative
Anti-spasmodic
Hypotensive
Galactagogue
Abortifacient

Indications

The fresh herb, so widely used in cookery, is a rich source of vitamin C. Medicinally, Parsley has three main areas of usage. Firstly, it is an effective diuretic, helping the body get rid of excess water and so may be used wherever such an effect is desired. Remember, however, that the cause of the problem must be sought and treated -don't just treat symptoms. The second area of use is as an emmenagogue stimulating the menstrual process. It is advisable not to use parsley in medicinal dosage during pregnancy asthere may be excessive stimulation of the womb. The third use is as a carminative, easing flatulence and the colic pains that may accompany it.  

Dosage

Infusion: pour a cup of boiling water onto l-2 teaspoonfuls of the leaves or root and let infuse for 5-l0 minutes in enclosed container. This should be drunk three times a day. Tincture: take 1-2 ml of the tincture three times a day.

Cautions

Do not use the essential oil internally unless under the guidance of a qualified health care practitioner. The constituent, apiole, in the essential oil can cause kidney inflammation. Parsley is contraindicated in pregnancy due to the emmenagogue effect and uterine stimulation reported in animal research.

 

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Complementary Health Institute

Where healing, teaching and discovery come together.  CHI offers more than just learning, it offers a new way of living...

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P.O. Box 143, Rye, Vic 3941

Website: www.chi-institute.com.au